Background

The Jane Sather Tower

The Campanile is a young structure, but it has an interesting history. Our project looks at how the tower was constructed and the economic and physical requirements behind this. We explore various issues that arose in its construction and planning, like the beginning of World War I. The tower has seen both bright and challenging days, and has been the host of many events commemorating the campus community and leadership within it. The Campanile is a 307 ft. tall, majestic tower centrally located on the UC Berkeley campus. It is relevant today because it keeps time and chimes it on the hour. The tower provides aesthetic appeal as it has musical performances multiple times per day. It also serves as a symbol of UC Berkeley pride and diligence in the pursuit of cutting edge knowledge and research. For these reasons it is of historical and contemporary importance. But the tower itself would mean nothing without the many interest groups affiliated with it. These people include students, faculty, staff, researchers, engineers, maintenance workers, receptionists, elevator operators, tourists and more. This section of our project looks closer at what it means to have such a diverse constituency, and how we can think of engaging all of them in the maintenance and celebration of Sather Tower as an object of contemporary social, political, economic, and cultural importance. Consultation includes feedback through interpretive apps that allow users to explore the ways that the tower is a vessel of excellence and a symbol of UC Berkeley that can bring pride and inspire awe. Groups can be tied together across the spaces of time and location in thinking of the tower as the centerpiece of Berkeley’s campus, the beacon atop it shining to illuminate the present and future possibilities that this institution enlivens in the hearts of its students, community members, and the world.

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Posted on November 24, 2015, in Anthro136kF2015, Sather-Tower. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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